Blog: Partner Highlights

Rae Ostman, Arizona State University
NISE Net partners in the Valley of the Sun celebrated the 2017 solar eclipse in a big way! In a pre-eclipse party, almost 900 people visited the Arizona Museum of Natural History, co-hosted by Arizona State University, to help build excitement and awareness of the event in the Phoenix metro area. On August 21, the School of Earth and Space Exploration at ASU hosted a Solar Eclipse 2017 viewing event at the Tempe campus where thousands of participants turned up to view the partial eclipse through solar telescopes and solar-safe glasses, watch live NASA coverage, engage with interactive displays, and talk with ASU researchers about the science behind the eclipse.
Jason Hammond, Children's Museum of Houston
Hurricane Harvey took aim at Houston dumping over 1 trillion gallons of water on the city - this is how much water is dumped over Niagara Falls in 17 days. The George R. Brown Convention Center was quickly set up as a relief shelter housing thousands of citizens, many of them children. Just before the storm had hit members of the Outreach Department at the Children’s Museum of Houston had created science kits that could be distributed to the shelters in case people were displaced. As Houston continues to rebuild after the hurricane, the Children’s Museum of Houston continues to provide educational and emotional support to families and students throughout the great city.
Jennifer Beck, Kearney Area Children's Museum
The Kearney Area Children’s Museum (KACM) reached for the stars as they opened their museum to the community for a special Free Family Fun Night with a solar-eclipse theme. Families enjoyed a variety of activities from the NISE Net Explore Science: Earth & Space kit geared towards educating children and their families about the solar eclipse, space exploration, and science.
Kayla Berry, Museum of Science
A few NISE Net partner highlights from the August 21, 2017 solar eclipse events, activities, public outreach, scientific data collection, and more!
Deborah Staber, L.C. Bates Museum
Since early 2017, with the help of the NISE Net's Explore Science: Earth & Space toolkit , the L.C.Bates Museum introduced the solar eclipse science to thousands of people and distributed over 3,000 pairs of solar eclipse glasses. The solar...
Andrew Spence, Kentucky Science Center
On a scale only previously seen at our gala fundraiser and the Thunder over Louisville extravaganza, Kentucky Science Center’s team joined forces on August 21, 2017 to deliver eclipse programming to three sites: two in totality and one at our...
Kayla Berry, Museum of Science
The continental U.S. hasn't seen a total eclipse like this since 1918 and so NISE Network partners have been busily preparing for the upcoming August 21st solar eclipse for months. Some, along or near the path of totality, have even...
Barbie Buckner, Educator Professional Development Specialist
NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s Office of Education at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California, has presented multiple solar eclipse workshops to regional educators to provide the resources needed to teach students about the first solar eclipse to be visible across all of North America in nearly 40 years.
By: Meagan Downey, Robinson Nature Center
Robinson Nature Center is a nature education facility in Columbia, MD whose mission is to facilitate the enjoyment and understanding of nature. Robinson includes a planetarium, dubbed the “NatureSphere” through which center staff interpret earth and space science concepts. Robinson was honored to receive a 2017 Explore Science: Earth & Space Toolkit to help patrons of the center discover phenomena studied by NASA in a whole new way.
By: Latongia Pepper, Roper Mountain Science Center
Roper Mountain Science Center welcomed over 2,200 visitors of all ages to Journey to Other Worlds for Space Day on March 11th. The Science Center partnered with organizations from across the Upstate to bring in interactive exhibits, stage shows, presentations, and hands-on activities to inspire, awe, and motivate visitors to LOOK UP and CATCH THE VISION of aviators and astronomers from the past, present, and future.