2010 Network Wide Meeting - Concurrent Sessions

Tuesday, October 26

1. Teacher Professional Development

Presenters will share several models for teacher professional development that immerse learners in the content of nanoscale science, and provide ready-to-implement lessons for integrating nanoscale science into curriculum. Participants will try out a number of classroom-ready activities.

  • Michelle Kortenaar, Education Program Manager, Sciencenter (Session Organizer)
  • Paul Doherty, Senior Scientist, Exploratorium
  • Joyce Palmer, Educational Outreach Nanotechnology, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Greta Zenner Petersen, Director of Education, Materials Research Science and Engineering Center on Nanostructured Interfaces, University of Wisconsin

2. Training Volunteers, Interns and Staff

In this workshop, we will share a few of the approaches used for training volunteers, interns, and staff on how to deliver content and engage in meaningful conversations about nanotechnology to the public. We will discuss the benefits and challenges that institutions may face in conducting training, and brainstorm ideas and resources that the NISE Net can offer to support each institution's training needs.

  • Jennifer Correa, Senior Manager of Explainers, New York Hall of Science (Session Organizer)
  • Shari Hartshorn, Program Manager, Science Museum of Minnesota
  • Karine Thate, Education Associate, Museum of Science

3. Nano for Young Audiences

Many people raise concerns initially when discussing doing nano programming in children’s museums – is the information too complex or abstract for younger children to understand? The key to successfully incorporating nano content into children's museums is the methodology behind how the programming is incorporated. In this hands-on sessions, we’ll discuss the philosophy of how children’s museums can embrace nano programming, present some exampes of how children’s museums have already adapted nano into their programming, and do some hands-on experiments, activities, and games from the NISE Net Catalog that fit well into a typical children’s museum setting.

  • Keith Ostfeld, Director of Exhibit and Program Development, Children’s Museum of Houston (Session Organizer)
  • Krystal Willeby, Matter Factory/How Does It Work? Educator, Children’s Museum of Houston (Session Organizer)
  • Christopher Bernd, Outreach Coordinator, Discovery Center Museum
  • Sarah Fisk, Director of Education and Museum Experience, The Children's Museum of Science and Technology
  • Elizabeth Martineau, Science Educator, Bradbury Science Museum
  • Gordon McDonough, Science Educator, Bradbury Science Museum
  • Amy Moll, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University
  • Nora Moynihan, Director of Education and Community Enrichment,  Port Discovery Children's Museum
  • Mike Rathbun, Associate Director, Discovery Center Museum
  • Becky Wolfe, Science Programmer, Indianapolis Children’s Museum

4. Nano Everywhere for Everyone

NISE Net activities can do more than just teach people about nano: they can also be effective tools for establishing new and strengthening existing connections with community-based organizations and school systems.  Four informal science organizations will share lessons learned and recommendations for using activities from the NISE Net catalog in these environments, as well as practical strategies for building partnerships.

  • Laura Huerta Migus, Director of Equity & Diversity, Association of Science-Technology Centers (Session Organizer)
  • Marilyn Johnson, Science Director, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry
  • Sookram Ramsaroop, Supervisor, Visitor Interactions, New York Hall of Science
  • Joe Schwanebeck, Outreach Coordinator, Science Center of Iowa

5. Nano Project Leads to Macro Partnership - a Success Story

The collaborative efforts of four scientific institutions in the Mid-South helped increase awareness of the cutting edge endeavors in nanotechnology and established a platform for workforce development opportunities through a series of programmatic efforts. This session will showcase a variety of innovative programs developed through a unique collaboration between a zoo, a science museum, a university, and a medical health center. Participants are encouraged to come and share their own approaches, successes and challenges with creating collaborative mini regional networks and programming.

  • Brad Herring, Director of Nanoscale Science Education, Museum of Life + Science (Session Organizer)
  • Helen M. Beady, Director of Education, Memphis Zoo
  • Alice A. (Alex) Eilers, Manager of Education, Pink Palace Museum
  • Ruomei Gao, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University
  • Anand Kulkarni, Assistant Professor in Pathology; Director, Tissue Services Core; University of Tennessee Health Science Center

6. From the Lab to the Classroom: Bringing Scientific Research to Science Ed

Cutting edge research is critically important to society as a whole, from a jobs perspective as well as a societal implications point of view. However, it is not easy to take technologies that are in the developmental stages in labs and disseminate them on the museum floor or in classrooms. In this discussion we will hear about successful strategies from educators, as well as from researchers active in education and outreach activities. We will also hear from researchers and people from the industry about hot research topics in nanotechnology that will have widespread impact.

  • Rashmi Nanjundaswamy, Project Manager, Center for Technology Innovation, Lawrence Hall of Science (Session Organizer)
  • Michael Bartl, Professor, Chemistry, University of Utah
  • Tobias Beetz, Associate Director, Center for Probing the Nanoscale, Stanford University
  • Nancy Healy, Education and Outreach Coordinator, National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN)
  • Amparo Leyman Pino, Education Consultant and Content Developer, Papalote Museo del Niño
  • George Lisensky, Professor, Chemistry, Beloit College
  • Aditi Risbud, External Relations/Outreach, The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Michael Thompson, Business Development Manager, Nanotechnology, FEI Company

7. A Guide to Research Center - ISE Partnerships

This session will focus on Small Steps, Big Impact: A Guide for Science Museum Leaders Developing Education Outreach Partnerships with University-Based Research Centers.  This recently-completed NISE Net guidebook is meant to help you move your science museum beyond event- or project-based collaborations with individual researchers toward more robust, sustaining partnerships with university centers of science and engineering research.  Presenters will introduce the guide, which includes: background information on the federally-funded, university-based research centers; practical advice on cultivating healthy partnerships; and details on the nanoscale partnership landscape.

  • Larry Bell, Senior Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Museum of Science (Session Organizer)
  • Carol Lynn Alpert, Director of Strategic Projects, Museum of Science

 

Wednesday, October 27

8. It’s a Nano Summer! Nanoscience in Museum Camp Programs

Nano camp programs are popping up around the country! Join us to learn more about museums using current science to grow their science camp programs and keep happy campers coming back year after year. We’ll explore a variety of programs, including focused lab programs and introductory activities, and look at ways to modify existing NISE Net materials for camps. Panelists will describe the challenges and successes of their own programs for audiences ranging from elementary to tweens and teens. As a group, we'll participate in a role-playing activity about nano and society, and brainstorm camp frameworks NISE Net can develop to fit the individual needs of different institutions.

  • Ali Stein, Exhibits Project Manager, Sciencenter (Session Organizer)
  • Sarah Fisk, Director of Education and Museum Experience, Children’s Museum of Science and Technology
  • Betty Jones, Educator, Museum of Science and Technology
  • Frank Kusiak, Science Educator, Lawrence Hall of Science
  • Rashmi Nanjundaswamy, Project Manager, Center for Technology Innovation, Lawrence Hall of Science

9. What “REU” and “RET” Really Mean: Professional Development and Opportunities for Collaboration with Young Researchers and K-12 Teachers

“REU” and “RET” are among many of the acronyms tossed around by scientific research and outreach communities, including the NISE Net.  Beyond defining them as Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) and Research Experiences for Teachers (RET), this session will help attendees understand the structures and purposes of these programs, as well as how they might relate to informal education professionals and institutes.  Each panel participant has significant experience with REU and/or RET at their institution and will share details, goals, and overall structure of their specific programs.   We will devote attention to interactions between REU/RET and informal education professionals and institutes, as well as discuss potential new collaborations and next steps in current collaborations.

  • Greta Zenner Petersen, Director of Education, Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) on Nanostructured Interfaces, University of Wisconsin-Madison (Session Organizer)
  • Andrew Greenberg, Associate Faculty Associate, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Co-Leader of Education and Outreach, Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC); Coordinator of Education and Outreach, Institute for Chemical Education; University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Donna Hammer, Associate Director, Director of Education Outreach Programs, MRSEC, University of Maryland
  • Nancy Healy, Education and Outreach Coordinator, National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN), Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Carol Lynn Alpert, Director of Strategic Projects, Museum of Science
  • Holly Burnside, Director of Outreach and Development, Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, Drexel University (tentative)

10. Nano For School Groups

Wondering how to integrate nano into your school group visits, school outreach efforts, and homeschool programs? A panel will share programming and activities that work in a variety of formal education contexts. Try out a number of hands-on activities, and take home ready-to-use lesson plans and activities.

  • Michelle Kortenaar, Education Program Manager, Sciencenter (Session Organizer)
  • Ilene Frank, Associate Director, Schenectady Museum and Suits-Bueche Planetarium
  • Juan López-Garriga, Director of the Science on Wheels Educational Center and Professor, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez
  • Becky Wolfe, Science Programmer, Indianapolis Children’s Museum

11. Best NanoDays Ever! 

Experience the fun, creative, and educational ways NISE Net partners have used their NanoDays kit – before, during and after the national NanoDays event. In addition to showing off how they’ve put on the best NanoDays ever, presenters will share new and unexpected things they’ve learned from an event using materials from their NanoDays kits.

  • Margaret Glass, Communications Coordinator, Association of Science-Technology Centers (Session Organizer)
  • Doug Borzynski, Facilitator of Learning, Buffalo Museum of Science
  • Nelson Cardona Martinez, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus
  • Nora Detweiler, Principal Community Relations Specialist, Brookhaven National Laboratory
  • Grace Kim, Program Manager, Piccola Accademia di Gagliato
  • Kim Hanson, Education Curator, Las Cruces Museum of Natural History
  • Victoria Scalise, Executive Director, Palouse Discovery Center
  • Suzi Taylor, Assistant Director of Outreach and Communications, MSU Extended University, Montana State University 

12. Making NanoDays Inclusive of All Learners

NISE Net strives to engage all learners in thinking about, discussing, and learning about nano. NanoDays 2011 is the perfect opportunity for all of us to consider how we can adapt and implement nano educational experiences so that they are inclusive of a broad audience. During this session, you'll have an opportunity to preview the new NanoDays 2011 kit activities, and critique and review them alongside representatives from different audience constituencies, such as people with disabilities, girls, and English Language Learners. You'll also learn specific strategies for creating and implementing educational experiences that are inclusive of all learners, and contribute ideas for ways the NanoDays 2012 kit activities could be designed to reflect the needs of the broad audiences we all serve.

  • Anna Lindgren-Streicher, Project Manager, Research and Evaluation, Museum of Science (Session Organizer)
  • Cassie Byrd, Program Coordinator for Extended Learning Group, Exploratorium
  • Paul Gabriel, Learning Specialist, TBC,
  • Veronica Garcia-Luis, Research Associate, Exploratorium
  • Shari Hartshorn, Program Manager, Science Museum of Minnesota
  • Amparo Leyman Pino, Education Consultant and Content Developer, Papalote Museo del Niño
  • Lulu Mc Court, Program Coordinator, Techbridge

13. Exploring The Uncertain Nanotech Future: Lessons in Anticipatory Governance

Although nanotech holds potentially limitless promise, the long-term societal and environmental implications are unclear.  What types of skills do citizens, policymakers, and stakeholders need in order to consider and shape the potential impacts of nanotechnology, before the realities become well-entrenched?  This working session will present models for envisioning, exploring, and conceptualizing the future of nanotech through methodologies such as media, deliberation, architecture, theater, and museum exhibits, while exploring and discussing the role of informal science education in providing activities to build these skills and put them into action.

  • David Sittenfeld, Program Manager, Forums, Museum of Science (Session Organizer)
  • Larry Bell, Senior Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Museum of Science
  • Gretchen Gano, Outreach and Education Coordinator, Center for Nanotechnology in Society, Arizona State University
  • Brad Herring, Director of Nanoscale Informal Science Education, Museum of Life + Science
  • Clark Miller, Associate Director, Center for Nanotechnology in Society, Arizona State University
  • Cynthia Selin, Assistant Research Professor, Center for Nanotechnology in Society, Arizona State University