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Pinch Test (High School curriculum lesson)

This lesson will be used as to assess student knowledge of size or SI prefixes and which equipment/tools you would need to view objects of particular sizes. The lesson can be used to see how much students know before teaching; to introduce them to the topic; or to assess what they have learned after teaching about size and SI prefixes. The concept of size and scale is important for students to learn so that they can understand how small the nanoscale is – objects between 1-100 nanometers.

The Micro and Macro Worlds (K-12 curriculum lesson)

This activity focuses on scale and the importance of using scale bars, for this is the most common feature when presenting nanoscale structures or nanoscale science. Understanding size and scale is fundamental to learning about nanotechnology as size defines the nanoscale . Size is often divided into scales – macro, micro, nano and atomic. Helping students understand these “worlds” is an important part of their science knowledge and will help them to understand the relatively small size of the nanoscale. It can be introduced into K–12 curriculum by discussing scientific measurement.

What's in Your Neighborhood? (K-12 curriculum lesson)

This activity gives students a sense of size and scale using their classroom and their neighborhood as a frame of reference. The activity focuses on measuring length, for this is the most common feature when presenting nanoscale structures or nanoscale science. Understanding size and scale is fundamental to learning about nanotechnology as size defines the nanoscale. It can be introduced into K–12 curriculum by discussing scientific measurement.

Shrink Me (K-12 curriculum lesson)

This activity focuses on measuring length, for this is the most common feature when presenting nanoscale structures or nanoscale science. Understanding size and scale is fundamental to learning about nanotechnology as size defines the nanoscale (1-100nm in one dimension). Size is often divided into scales – macro, micro, nano and atomic. Helping students understand these “worlds” is an important part of their science knowledge and will help them to understand the relatively small size of the nanoscale. It can be introduced into K–12 curriculum by discussing scientific measurement.

Scale Models (Elementary, Middle, and High School curriculum lesson)

This lesson introduces scale by demonstrating scales as factors of ten. This facilitates the introduction and reinforcement of the metric scale and paves the way to the discussion of lengths that are smaller than what can be seen with the naked eye. The lesson also introduces the concept of using different tools to address different length scales. Understanding size and scale is fundamental to learning about nanotechnology as size defines the nanoscale. This activity connects well to the introduction of atoms and cell structures as well as advancements in technology.

Noodling Around (K-12 curriculum lesson)

This activity develops a K–12 student’s skills in measurement by using a pool noodle to measure objects. The activity encourages students to consider features that are useful when developing or using a measurement tool. This lesson introduces scale by demonstrating scales as factors of ten. This facilitates the introduction and reinforcement of the metric scale and paves the way to the discussion of lengths that are smaller than what can be seen with the naked eye. The lesson also introduces the concept of using different tools to address different length scales.

Silver Nanoparticle Socks (High School curriculum lesson)

This lab will allow students to use the pure silver nanoparticles they synthesize to create antibacterial socks. They will compare their socks with socks that have been treated with a commercial silver spray, socks that have been treated in a factory, and a control that was not been treated. After a 24-hour period in which the bacteria will be allowed to grow on the agar plates, each culture (which will contain a piece of sock) will be observed for a zone of inhibition. Socks are easy for students to relate to and show how nanoparticles can have simple relevant applications.

Silver Nanoparticle Synthesis, Spectroscopy, and Bacterial Growth (High School curriculum lesson)

Students will learn about the differences in physical propoerties at the nanoscale as compared to the same materials at the macroscale. The students will demonstrate the appropriate use of a spectrophotometer and will convert between different units of measurement. This unit assists students in working with scale and unit conversion.

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