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Size and Scale - Learning About Measurement (Elementary/Middle School curriculum lesson)

Students will visualize the order of numerical properties of objects from the nanoscale to visible scale using exponents and decimals. Students will make size comparisons of objects. Students will develop an understanding of how small a nanometer is in comparison to common objects. They will also learn about the metric system.

Electro-deposition of Copper on a Filter Template for Growing Nanowires (High School AP and Undergraduate Chemistry curriculum lesson)

This experiment will use an electro-plating process to transfer metal ions in a solution to a template to produce nanowires. In this experiment, an anode (platinum strip) will be used in a solution of copper sulfate. Copper will be plated out onto the pores of a filter at the cathode. Students will discover how nanowires can be created to further understand the reduction-oxidation process, Ohm’s law, and the mechanism of metal electroplating.

Synthesis and Stability of Silver Nanoplates (Undergraduate Chemistry curriculum lesson)

Silver nanoparticles can take the shape of cubes, spheres, bars, wires, bi-pyramids, beams, plates, and discs depending upon the seed it forms from. Students will learn about the differences in physical properties and behavior at the nanoscale as compared to the same materials at the macroscale. This lesson assists students in working with scale and unit conversion.

The Effects of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles on Brine Shrimp: A Toxicology Study (High School curriculum lesson)

This lab is designed to help students understand the following: the interdisciplinary fields of science, a practical application of chemistry in the real world, and the need to carefully conduct experiments and evaluate data in a collaborative environment. In this experiment, students will compare the toxicity of different concentrations of nanoparticle suspensions on brine shrimp, along with controls, to perform toxicity assays and data analysis.

Using Modeling to Demonstrate Self-Assembly in Nanotechnology (High School curriculum lesson)

There are two activities in this lesson, the Fly Prison and the Water Maze. The Fly Prison is a hands-on modeling activity designed to introduce students to the area of nanotechnology and give them a basic understanding of how researchers build very small devices by the self-assembly of molecules. The Water Maze is a follow up activity to give the students a chance to practice and demonstrate what they have learned.

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