Computing

Silicon Nano-Biosensor

Silicon Nano-Biosensor
This scanning electron micrograph depicts the functional part of a nano-biosensor containing silicon nanowires. Field effect transistors are best known for their key role in computer microprocessors, but their compatibility with various microfabrication strategies has also led researchers to study them for biosensing applications. For example, glucose biosensors may lead to important innovations in the management of diabetes. The lithographic manufacturing processes involved in their production may mean that such sensors can be produced in quantity and scaled for different applications.

Minimum credit: 

Raj Mohanty, Boston University

Size: 

Each nanowire has a diameter of 50 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

833

Pixels: Height: 

709

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanowire

Silicon Nanowire
This transmission electron microscope image shows a single silicon nanowire. Thermoelectric materials convert heat to electricity and vice versa. Most fossil-fuel-powered engines generate waste heat, so researchers are using nanotechnologies to explore ways of making thermoelectric devices more efficient in order to convert that waste heat to usable power—and thus save energy.

Minimum credit: 

Renkun Chen, University of California at Berkeley

Size: 

The diameter of this nanowire is approximately 100 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

1215

Pixels: Height: 

1215

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanowire Array

Silicon Nanowire Array
This is a scanning electron microscope image of a silicon nanowire array synthesized for thermoelectric applications. Thermoelectric materials convert heat to electricity and vice versa. Most fossil-fuel-powered engines generate waste heat, so researchers are using nanotechnologies to explore ways of making thermoelectric devices more efficient in order to convert that waste heat to usable power—and thus save energy.

Minimum credit: 

Renkun Chen, University of California at Berkeley

Size: 

Each nanowire is approximately 100 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1233

Pixels: Height: 

1233

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest

Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest
This scanning electron microscope image shows a wall of carbon nanotubes. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are nested within each other. They exhibit extraordinary strength and unique electrical properties. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are actually tubes nested within tubes. These cylindrical carbon molecules have extraordinary strength and important electrical properties, making them potentially useful for many applications in electronics, optics, and other areas of materials science, as well as architectural fields.

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The diameter of a nanotube is around 10 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

768

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Photonic Crystal

Photonic Crystal
This is a scanning electron microscope image of a photonic crystal. The periodic arrangement of the holes in the material controls the movement of light within the crystal. A photonic crystal's highly ordered and repetitive structure affects the way light moves through it. Similar periodic arrangements are found in nature—for example, in precious opals and in the wings of the Blue Morpho butterfly—and scientists are studying these natural periodic structures to learn more about their properties and potential applications. These crystals have potential uses in computer engineering, lenses and optics, and variable-color paints and inks.

Minimum credit: 

Andrei Faraon, Stanford University

Size: 

Each hole is about 200 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

645

Pixels: Height: 

516

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanomembrane

Silicon Nanomembrane
Air bubbles trapped beneath a silicon crystal film are shown in this optical microscope image. Light passing through the bubbles creates the circular patterns and colors. Extremely thin films like these have important electrical properties and therefore find numerous applications in ultra-fast computer chips and high-yield solar cells. This image shows an intermediate stage of their production; trapped air bubbles are removed in later processing.

Minimum credit: 

Shelly Scott, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Size: 

The sample imaged is 27 nm thick and a few cm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

1600

Pixels: Height: 

1200

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Liquid Crystal

Liquid Crystal
This is an optical microscope image of a liquid crystal (Cromlyn in water). The colors are created by molecular variations or changes in the crystal's thickness. Liquid crystals have properties of both liquids and solids: Although they can flow like a fluid, their molecules are highly ordered, like those found in solid crystals. The ubiquitous liquid crystal displays (LCDs) found in everything from watches to cell phones are made possible by devices that rapidly alter the structure of these substances—and therefore the way they interact with light.

Minimum credit: 

Gary Koenig, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The sample is 350 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

1600

Pixels: Height: 

1200

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nickel Nanowires

Nickel Nanowires
The orientation of the nickel nanowires shown in this scanning electron microscope can be changed by altering the direction of an applied magnetic field. Nanowires are a key focus of nanotechnology research due to their potential uses in nanoscale electronic, magnetic, optical, and mechanical devices. Nickel nanowires in particular may play an important role in increasing the memory capacity of computer hard disc drives.

Minimum credit: 

Wendy Crone, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Size: 

The nanowires are 100-200 nm in diameter and about 20 µm in length.

Pixels: Width: 

588

Pixels: Height: 

389

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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