Tool: Scanning Electron Microscope

Zinc Oxide Nanowire Photodetector

Zinc Oxide Nanowire Photodetector
This scanning electron microscope image shows a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire photodetector device grown by photolithography. Nanowires geometry and structure make them both sensitive to light and efficient low-noise signaling devices, so they are ideally suited for applications involving light—such as detection, imaging, information storage, and intrachip optical communications. In addition, different types of nanowires can be combined to create devices sensitive to different wavelengths of light. Zinc oxide's (ZnO) electrical, optoelectronic, and photochemical properties have led to its use in solar cells, transparent electrodes, and blue/UV light-emitting devices.

Minimum credit: 

Cesare Soci, University of California at San Diego

Size: 

The separation between the "fingers" is 2 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

645

Pixels: Height: 

484

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nanowire Photodetector

Nanowire Photodetector
This scanning electron micrograph shows a gallium nitride nanowire photodetector device with a zinc oxide core grown by e-beam lithography. The geometry and structure of nanowires make them both sensitive to light and efficient low-noise signaling devices, so they are ideally suited for applications involving light—such as detection, imaging, information storage, and intrachip optical communications. In addition, different types of nanowires can be combined to create devices sensitive to different wavelengths of light.

Minimum credit: 

Dr. Xinyu Bao, University of California at San Diego

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The nanowire has a diameter of about 200 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

646

Pixels: Height: 

484

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nano-Biosensor

Silicon Nano-Biosensor
This scanning electron micrograph depicts the functional part of a nano-biosensor containing silicon nanowires. Field effect transistors are best known for their key role in computer microprocessors, but their compatibility with various microfabrication strategies has also led researchers to study them for biosensing applications. For example, glucose biosensors may lead to important innovations in the management of diabetes. The lithographic manufacturing processes involved in their production may mean that such sensors can be produced in quantity and scaled for different applications.

Minimum credit: 

Raj Mohanty, Boston University

Size: 

Each nanowire has a diameter of 50 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

833

Pixels: Height: 

709

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanowire Device

Silicon Nanowire Device
This scanning electron microscope image shows a silicon nanowire resting on two silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. Thermoelectric materials convert heat to electricity and vice versa. Most fossil-fuel-powered engines generate waste heat, so researchers are using nanotechnologies to explore ways of making thermoelectric devices more efficient in order to convert that waste heat to usable power—and thus save energy. This assembly was built to measure the thermal conductivity of a silicon nanowire synthesized specifically for thermoelectric applications.

Minimum credit: 

Renkun Chen, University of California at Berkeley

Size: 

The diameter of the central nanowire is approximately 100 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

510

Pixels: Height: 

441

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanowire Array

Silicon Nanowire Array
This is a scanning electron microscope image of a silicon nanowire array synthesized for thermoelectric applications. Thermoelectric materials convert heat to electricity and vice versa. Most fossil-fuel-powered engines generate waste heat, so researchers are using nanotechnologies to explore ways of making thermoelectric devices more efficient in order to convert that waste heat to usable power—and thus save energy.

Minimum credit: 

Renkun Chen, University of California at Berkeley

Size: 

Each nanowire is approximately 100 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1233

Pixels: Height: 

1233

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gold Nanoshells (SEM)

Gold Nanoshells (SEM)
To create this scanning electron microscope image, gold nanoshells were dispersed in a drop of water which then dried on a glass microscope slide. The colors are due to selective scattering of light by nanoscale particles. Gold Nanoshells have a variety of uses in nanotechnology, and especially in biomedical applications. Nanoshells like these may play important roles in new kinds of cancer treatments, disease detection, and imaging techniques.

Minimum credit: 

Gary Koenig, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

These gold nanoshells are each about 120 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

768

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Cholera Bacteria

Cholera Bacteria
The cholera bacteria in this scanning electron microscope image cause a potentially fatal disease of the digestive system.

Minimum credit: 

Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility

Size: 

These bacteria are each about 500 nm wide and 1-2 µm long.

Pixels: Width: 

788

Pixels: Height: 

600

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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HIV-Infected Cells

HIV-Infected Cells
The tissue culture shown in this scanning electron microscope image is infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, or HIV.

Minimum credit: 

Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility

Size: 

HIV particles are 90-120 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

640

Pixels: Height: 

480

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Single Hair from a Gecko's Foot

Single Hair from a Gecko's Foot
The feet of the gecko cling to virtually any surface. This scanning electron microscope image shows one of the branching hairs, or setae, on the sole of a gecko's foot. These hairs nestle into nanoscale niches on the contact surface. The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place.

Minimum credit: 

Autumn Kellar, Lewis & Clark College

Size: 

Each seta measures about 200 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

2048

Pixels: Height: 

2048

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nanotubes Mimicking Gecko Feet

Nanotubes Mimicking Gecko Feet
The nanoscale structures on a gecko's foot enable it to cling to most surfaces. This scanning electron microscope image shows multiwalled carbon nanotubes attached to a polymer backing, an experiment designed to replicate the gecko foot's adhesive properties. The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place.

Minimum credit: 

Ali Dhinojwala, University of Akron

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

Each bundle of carbon nanotubes measures about 70-80 µm in width.

Pixels: Width: 

1181

Pixels: Height: 

1181

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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