Tool: Scanning Electron Microscope

Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest

Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest
This scanning electron microscope image shows a wall of carbon nanotubes. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are nested within each other. They exhibit extraordinary strength and unique electrical properties. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are actually tubes nested within tubes. These cylindrical carbon molecules have extraordinary strength and important electrical properties, making them potentially useful for many applications in electronics, optics, and other areas of materials science, as well as architectural fields.

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The diameter of a nanotube is around 10 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

768

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Human Red Blood Cells (SEM)

Human Red Blood Cells (SEM)
Red blood cells carry a protein called hemoglobin which has a molecular structure adapted to transport oxygen to body tissues. This scanning electron micrograph shows the cells' characteristic donut-like shapes.

Minimum credit: 

Janice Carr, CDC

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The typical diameter of a human red blood cell is 6-8 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

540

Pixels: Height: 

366

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nasturtium Leaf (10,000X)

Nasturtium Leaf (10,000X)
The Lotus Effect describes water droplets rolling off leaf surfaces, removing dirt and contaminants in the process. This phenomenon can also be seen in the more common nasturtium. Scanning electron microscope images show that nasturtium leaves are covered by waxy nanocrystal bundles. The uneven surface created by these tiny structures traps air between water and leaf, causing the water to roll off. Research on such nanoscale effects has inspired revolutionary new materials, including water- and stain-resistant fabrics.

Minimum credit: 

A. Otten and S. Herminghaus, Göttingen, Germany

Size: 

Each wax nanocrystal bundle is about 1-2 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

666

Pixels: Height: 

512

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nasturtium Leaf (8000X)

Nasturtium Leaf (8000X)
The Lotus Effect describes water droplets rolling off leaf surfaces, removing dirt and contaminants in the process. This phenomenon can also be seen in the more common nasturtium. Scanning electron microscope images show that nasturtium leaves are covered by waxy nanocrystal bundles. The uneven surface created by these tiny structures traps air between water and leaf, causing the water to roll off. Research on such nanoscale effects has inspired revolutionary new materials, including water- and stain-resistant fabrics.

Minimum credit: 

Ann Marshall, Stanford University

Size: 

The wax nanocrystal bundles covering the leaf are each about 1-2 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

645

Pixels: Height: 

522

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nasturtium Leaf (2500X)

Nasturtium Leaf (2500X)
The Lotus Effect describes water droplets rolling off leaf surfaces, removing dirt and contaminants in the process. This phenomenon can also be seen in the more common nasturtium. Scanning electron microscope images show that nasturtium leaves are covered by waxy nanocrystal bundles. The uneven surface created by these tiny structures traps air between water and leaf, causing the water to roll off. Research on such nanoscale effects has inspired revolutionary new materials, including water- and stain-resistant fabrics.

Minimum credit: 

Ann Marshall, Stanford University

Size: 

The veins form sections on the leaf. The average size of these sections is 20-40 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

645

Pixels: Height: 

522

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn

Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn
Nanoscale fibers drawn from multiwalled carbon nanotubes have strengths comparable to spider silk. Replacing metal wires in electronic textiles with these super-strong yarns could lead to important new functionalities, such as the ability to actuate (as an artificial muscle) and to store energy (as a fiber super-capacitor or battery).

Minimum credit: 

Mei Zhang, University of Texas at Dallas

Size: 

The yarn's diameter is about 1 µm. The nanotubes from which it is being drawn are each about 10 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1022

Pixels: Height: 

718

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gecko Foot (8700X)

Gecko Foot (8700X)
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

Cliff Mathisen, FEI Company

Pixels: Width: 

493

Pixels: Height: 

522

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gecko Foot (1660X)

Gecko Foot (1660X)
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

Cliff Mathisen, FEI Company

Pixels: Width: 

379

Pixels: Height: 

401

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Gecko Toe

Gecko Toe
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

Cliff Mathisen, FEI Company

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

1084

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Blue Morpho Butterfly Wing Ridges

Blue Morpho Butterfly Wing Ridges
This scanning electron microscope image shows ridges on a Blue Morpho Butterfly wing scale. These ridges contain nanoscale structures that reflect light to create the Morpho's iridescent colors. The Blue Morpho is common in Central and South America and known for its bright blue wings. However, these iridescent colors are created not by pigments in the wing tissues but instead by the way light interacts with nanometer-sized structures on the Morpho's wing scales. This effect is being studied as a model in the development of new fabrics, dye-free paints, and anti-counterfeit technologies for currency.

Minimum credit: 

Shinya Yoshioka, Osaka University

Size: 

Each ridge is about 800 nm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

1392

Pixels: Height: 

1028

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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