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Singlewalled Nanotube Paper

Singlewalled Nanotube Paper
A bundle of singlewalled nanotubes processed into a thin sheet is shown in this scanning electron microscope image. Singlewalled nanotubes are extremely important in the continuing miniaturization of electronic devices. These tubes have an average diameter of 1-2 nm. Their electrical properties have led to their investigation as super capacitors for storing electrical charges.

Minimum credit: 

Mei Zhang, University of Texas at Dallas

Size: 

The thickness of the sheet is about 50 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

768

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nano-Biosensor

Silicon Nano-Biosensor
This scanning electron micrograph depicts the functional part of a nano-biosensor containing silicon nanowires. Field effect transistors are best known for their key role in computer microprocessors, but their compatibility with various microfabrication strategies has also led researchers to study them for biosensing applications. For example, glucose biosensors may lead to important innovations in the management of diabetes. The lithographic manufacturing processes involved in their production may mean that such sensors can be produced in quantity and scaled for different applications.

Minimum credit: 

Raj Mohanty, Boston University

Size: 

Each nanowire has a diameter of 50 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

833

Pixels: Height: 

709

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanowire Device

Silicon Nanowire Device
This scanning electron microscope image shows a silicon nanowire resting on two silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. Thermoelectric materials convert heat to electricity and vice versa. Most fossil-fuel-powered engines generate waste heat, so researchers are using nanotechnologies to explore ways of making thermoelectric devices more efficient in order to convert that waste heat to usable power—and thus save energy. This assembly was built to measure the thermal conductivity of a silicon nanowire synthesized specifically for thermoelectric applications.

Minimum credit: 

Renkun Chen, University of California at Berkeley

Size: 

The diameter of the central nanowire is approximately 100 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

510

Pixels: Height: 

441

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanowire

Silicon Nanowire
This transmission electron microscope image shows a single silicon nanowire. Thermoelectric materials convert heat to electricity and vice versa. Most fossil-fuel-powered engines generate waste heat, so researchers are using nanotechnologies to explore ways of making thermoelectric devices more efficient in order to convert that waste heat to usable power—and thus save energy.

Minimum credit: 

Renkun Chen, University of California at Berkeley

Size: 

The diameter of this nanowire is approximately 100 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

1215

Pixels: Height: 

1215

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanowire Array

Silicon Nanowire Array
This is a scanning electron microscope image of a silicon nanowire array synthesized for thermoelectric applications. Thermoelectric materials convert heat to electricity and vice versa. Most fossil-fuel-powered engines generate waste heat, so researchers are using nanotechnologies to explore ways of making thermoelectric devices more efficient in order to convert that waste heat to usable power—and thus save energy.

Minimum credit: 

Renkun Chen, University of California at Berkeley

Size: 

Each nanowire is approximately 100 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1233

Pixels: Height: 

1233

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Glass Nanowire

Glass Nanowire
In this optical microscope image, light can be seen passing though a silica nanowire on a silica aerogel surface. New technologies have made it possible to draw glass in long, ultra-smooth wires with uniform diameters in the nanometer range. Because of their extraordinary uniformity, these nanowires have unique properties important in optics and photonics, both of which require precise control of light.

Minimum credit: 

Eric Mazur, Harvard University

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

This nanowire is 530 nm long and the radius of the bent wire is 8 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

1000

Pixels: Height: 

752

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Glass Nanowire

Glass Nanowire
This is a scanning electron microscope image of a silica nanowire on a silica aerogel surface. New technologies have made it possible to draw glass in long, ultra-smooth wires with uniform diameters in the nanometer range. Because of their extraordinary uniformity, these nanowires have unique properties important in optics and photonics, both of which require precise control of light.

Minimum credit: 

Eric Mazur, Harvard University

Size: 

The nanowire is 530 nm long and the radius of the bent wire is 8 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

1000

Pixels: Height: 

752

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery