Nano Bite: January 2011

Welcome to the January Nano Bite, the monthly e-newsletter for the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (NISE Net).
What's New? 
 NanoDays 2011 Kits are Packed!
As the new year begins, staff at the Science Museum of Minnesota have completed the assembly process for all 200 NanoDays 2011 kits. Kits will begin shipping out on January 7th. For pictures of the assembly process and completed kits in the warehouse, see the blog postNanoDays kits packed up in Minnesota.
- Don't forget, if your institution is not getting a physical kit, the digital kits will be available for download beginning January 15th.
 
→ New to the NISE Net Catalog
Mastering Science and Public Presentations Video: This seminar on technical communication and presentations was prepared and given by Tim Miller of SpokenScience.com. Mastering Science and Public Presentations provides the fundamentals for sharing science with the public.  Miller explains how to choose the best tools to communicate and shares tips and tricks to take scientific presentations to the next level. The video was developed from a presentation Miller gave at Duke University in summer 2010.
 
 
What Else?
 
→ New Blog Posts on nisenet.org
There are seven new NanoDays activities in the 2011 kits. The materials for these activities will be included in the physical kits, but you can also download the activity guides, graphics, signs, and more for each from the online catalog.
- One of the new activities, Exploring Forces - Static Electricity investigates a force that affects many of us as the air gets more dry and we wear extra layers in the winter!
 
Larry Bell recently attended a couple meetings in and around Washington, DC.
- At the National Science Foundation's meeting of nanoscale science and engineering grantees, Larry blogged about Nanoelectronics, a new Periodic Table of Nanoparticles, the breakdown of Nano Research Money in 2010, and new research in Education (including educating an avatar!)
- At the National Nanotechnology Initiative Innovation Summit, three past and present Presidential advisors opened the Summit and focused a great deal onEducation.
 
- To view these and other NISE Net blog posts, visit http://www.nisenet.org/blog
→ Nano in the News
- The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) recently featured an article on the potential risks of nanotechnology as the cover story for their magazine, Prism - Peril in Small Places: What dangers lurk in our expanding use of nanotechnology?
- One new idea explored on popsci.com features the utilization of carbon nanotubes to help Harvest Wind Energy at 30,000 Feet.
 
 Nano Training Opportunities!
The Nanotechnology Applications & Career Knowledge Center (NACK) is offering funding for those from two-year institutions with an interest in integrating nanotech into their institution to attend and participate in their workshops. Visit nano4me.org for more about available resources from NACK. They also offer a series of Webinars for download.
 
 
 Making Stuff Premiers January 19 on PBS
Technology reporter David Pogue hosts the four-part special series exploring the materials that will shape our future, including a section on nanotechnologies.  Find out more athttp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/making-stuff.html
     
Nano Haikus
We had two new great haikus this month that relate to nano news articles:
Asian hornets are
powered by nano solar
at the sun's zenith.
by Frank Kusiak of the Lawrence Hall of Science. This Haiku relates to the BBC article Oriental hornets powered by 'solar energy'
After reading about the use of cinnamon in the production of gold nanoparticlesVrylena Olney got hungry - and creative: 
 
Cinnamon: good for
pumpkin pie, Moroccan stew,
nanoparticles.
 
Questions? Haikus? Contributions to the newsletter? Contact Eli Bossin at ebossin@mos.org